GoingFullCircleBlog

Growing Worshiping Disciples on Mission for Christ


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An Easy Discipleship Plan for Worship Leaders

IT’S YOUR TIME…

to become a Disciple-Maker who makes disciple-makers!

Here’s an easy plan that YOU can use to start an interactive, relational discipleship group to grow disciples in your worship ministry.  It’s simple, requires a minimum of preparation, but will lead to deeper discipling relationships in your group.  Remember… worship is not an end in itself, but rather the ignition key to discipleship and missions.  IT’S YOUR TIME!

  • Recruit and gather your group.  Start on time. At each group meeting, a different group member will volunteer to be the story-teller. A volunteer for the following week will be enlisted at the end of the session.
  • The leader will begin by asking those present to share some experiences they had during the past week. Ask: “How has God worked through you as his missionary since our last meeting?” After a few minutes of sharing, the leader will call on this week’s storyteller to begin today’s story.
  • The storyteller for this session will begin by saying: “This is the story from God’s word.” They then re-tell today’s Bible story from memory in their own words in an engaging manner that reflects their own personality. They should not add personal comments or explanation and should conclude by saying: “That’s the story from God’s word.”
  • The storyteller will ask someone to lead a prayer asking God to reveal his will for each participant in today’s group.
  • The storyteller directs the group to look at today’s Bible story in the Scripture. The storyteller will ask “what” and “why” questions of the group about the story. In this way, they will rebuild the story, checking to see if any element was omitted or accidentally changed
  • Discuss: “Which character in the story do you relate to most? Why?
  • Discuss: “What did you learn from this story that is new to you? What surprised you?”
  • Discuss: “What do we learn about God from this story?”
  • Discuss: “What do we learn about people from this story?”
  • Discuss: “How do you think God wants you to apply what you have learned?”
  • Accountability Question: “With whom will you share the story this week?”
  • Accountability question: “Where will you be on mission with God before our next meeting?”
  • Invite the group to pray aloud for each other to close the group study.
  • Enlist a storyteller for the next session.
  • Remind the group of total confidentiality of everything shared today. This is crucial and must be honored at all times.
  • State the next meeting date/time and then dismiss. Send the group out. End on time.

Here is a list of Bible stories and Scripture references for a curriculum to lead your group to go full circle in worship-discipleship-missions. These Bible stories focus first on worship, then discipleship, and finally missions for worship leaders. The stories are listed in chronological order as they occur in Scripture. But you may use them in the order that best fits your full circle group. There are eighteen stories listed, six each under the headings of worship-discipleship-mission.
Worship
Numbers 8:5–26: Calling and commissioning the Levites, worship
leaders in the Tabernacle.
1 Chronicles 29:1–20: David called the nation of Israel to build the temple.
Isaiah 6:1-8: God revealed himself to Isaiah in the temple.
Matthew 28:16–20: Jesus’ followers worshiped him and he gave them
the Great Commission.
Acts 16:16–40: Paul and Silas worshiped in prison; earthquake freed
them for mission.
Revelation 4:1–11: Worship in heaven around God’s throne.

Discipleship
Daniel 3: The golden image and the fiery furnace.
Daniel 6: Daniel in the lion’s den.
Matthew 4:18–22: Jesus calling the first disciples.
Luke 4:1–13: Satan tempted Jesus.
Mark 10:17–31: The rich young man.
John 13:1-30: The greatest commandment.

Mission
Jonah 1:1 to 3:5: God called Jonah to missions.
Matthew 9: 9–23: Jesus ate with sinners, taught about wineskins, and
healed many.
Matthew 18:1–6: Who is the greatest?
Luke 10:25–37: The parable of the good Samaritan.
Acts 15: 1–12: The Jerusalem Council.
Acts 17:16–34: Paul preached in Athens.

If you need help or other resources email me at markpowers@scbaptist.org.  I’m serving HIM by serving YOU!  MP

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One Simple Resolution… Grow Disciplemakers! That’s it.

GFC icon And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds.

Let us not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing,

but let us encourage one another.

Hebrews 10:24–25a, NIV

Do you make New Year’s Resolutions? I make a few myself. But here’s the one that really counts in God’s Kingdom: “To Make Disciples Who Make Disciples!”  OK, Worship Leaders, do you have a plan for developing disciple makers in your worship ministry during 2017? NO?  Why not?

Come on, let’s get on it!  There are many great plans out there from all kinds of sources.  Go find one.  If you need some ideas and materials, email me at markpowers@scbaptist.org and I’ll send you several that we promote from our offices.

But make sure, whatever you do, that you use a method that fits TODAY’S SOCIETAL NEEDS!

Avery Willis in 2005 noted the changes in America that are opening the door for storying in our own society: “The post-modern culture drives much of the revival of storytelling in the United States . . . Most of today’s younger generation and even many of the baby boomers of the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s prefer to learn through spoken and visual means rather than written word. There is also a preference towards relational, non-linear learning . . . The problem before us is that most of our preaching, Bible studies, evangelism and discipleship are reader-oriented and very linear-sequential. So how do we change? That is the question of the hour. We must do something before this wave engulfs us and before we lose a whole generation for the cause of Christ.”

If you don’t understand Bible Storying as a disciple making method then STAY TUNED to this blog all during the month of January as I lay it out for you.

Jesus knew the power of stories to communicate truth. When we think of Jesus, we naturally think of his teaching in parables. Stories conveying truth occur throughout the Bible. Bible stories are actual historic accounts while parables are metaphors that are developed to illustrate a point of truth. Both are wonderful means of conveying truth through storying.

The simplicity of the storying method of Bible study is obvious. This simplicity creates a reproducible process in a relational environment, and this is the key to the method’s appeal and accessibility. Using this simple method, you can start a full circle group in your worship ministry and lead it to multiply throughout your church and community every six to twelve months. And further, by adopting a mission project for the duration of your group, you are creating a missional community with a goal of establishing a mission outpost that may become an indigenous church with ongoing cultivation.

Get Ready… Get Set… GO make disciples who make disciples!  — Mark Powers

— Willis, “Storying Going Mainstream.”


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How to Grow 14 Billion Disciplemakers in 70 years

http://egoodography.wix.com/home

Jesus went out and saw a tax collector named Levi sitting at the tax office,

and He said to him, “Follow Me!” So, leaving everything behind,

he got up and began to follow Him.

Luke 5:27–28, HCSB

Have you ever heard of the Bible-Storying Method of Discipleship? It’s an ancient-future approach to teaching the Bible and growing disciple-makers and it is sweeping the world in many different forms.  The goal is to grow spiritual dynamos who are fully invested in going full circle with God.  One of the forms this movement is taking is the Real Life Ministries approach.

Real Life Ministries (RLM) is a non-denominational Evangelical Christian church in Post Falls, Idaho. Planted in 1998, the church has grown to an average weekend attendance of more than 7,000. The unique characteristic of Real Life is a Bible study methodology called storying that grew out of a partnership with Avery Willis. Willis who served as president of an Indonesian seminary, wrote MasterLife discipleship plan, served as executive strategist for 5,500 missionaries with the International Mission Board, and ended his career with the International Orality Network.

After several years of discussion with Willis, Real Life decided to introduce Bible-storying into their small groups. The experiment was so successful that they trained all their pastors, community pastors, and small group leaders in the method. They found that the storying method:

  1. Helps people learn the Bible,
  2. Makes it easier to recruit small group leaders,
  3. Facilitates real learning,
  4. Equips members for ministry,
  5. Empowers parents to disciple their kids,
  6. Helps small group leaders understand the spiritual needs of those they are discipling,
  7. Keeps small groups from becoming boring, and
  8. Encourages transparency and real relationships.

Real Life identifies three major keys to making disciples according to God’s plan:

1. An intentional leader,

2. A relational environment,

3. A reproducible process.

The Real Life Discipleship Training Manual presents the mathematical process of kingdom multiplication:

  1. One disciple makes three disciple-makers every five years.
  2. If those three disciple-makers do the same every five years, in ten years there will be almost 180,000 disciple-makers.

  3. If they continue… in seventy years (less than the average life span), there are potentially fourteen billion disciple-makers. That is twice the number of people currently occupying our planet.

SO WHAT ARE WE WAITING FOR?  LET’S DO THIS!  Email me at markpowers@scbaptist.org and I’ll send you a Bible Storying method called “Discipleship TRIOS” that can help you make this happen. And next week in our next blog, I’ll share more details of what Bible-Storying is and how it can work for you. See you then.  — Mark Powers

 

*Putnam, Willis, Guindon, Krause. Real-Life Discipleship Training Manual: Equipping Disciples Who Make Disciples.


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The One-Day Missional Life Retreat for Your Worship Team

GFC iconYour first step to introduce your worship team to missional thinking can be a One-Day Missional Life Retreat in the context of a special rehearsal retreat. We cannot expect them to grow into deeper discipleship and more active missions until they have developed the missional mindset.

During this retreat, you will rehearse and prepare music for upcoming corporate worship while you are introducing basic missional life concepts. The best time of year for this retreat to occur is in either early January or just after Labor Day. An alternative could be a few weeks after Easter, but our hectic spring schedules make this alternative the third choice. The retreat could be scheduled on a Saturday morning, Sunday afternoon, or week night. It can be effective if held in your own rehearsal space, though you might want to consider an offsite retreat.

Here is the outline for a One-Day Missional Life retreat:

  • Enjoy fellowship time with light snacks, 30 minutes before official start time.
  • Warm up and rehearse worship songs for the upcoming Sunday.
  • Present videos, testimonies and statistics introducing the decline of Christian affiliation in our country (Search this site for updated stats: http://www.pewforum.org/data/.) Then present stories of needs in your own community: spiritual darkness, illiteracy, teen pregnancy, crime, illicit drug use, etc. Consider inviting someone from the police or sheriff ’s department, a school administrator, or a social worker to share local stories of need. Ask your worship team to share with each other the needs and challenges they see in your community with the person on their right.
  • Explain the concept of “Going Full Circle” and how our worship must move us to deeper discipleship and active missions. Lead a time of prayer and sing a song for God to open our eyes to see our world as he sees it.
  • Rehearse another song or two for future worship services. Choosing songs to learn and rehearse that reflect our call to missional living will strengthen the impact of the event.
  • Ask your team to discuss these questions with the person on their left:
    Where in the Bible does it say that we will win the world by getting people into church? What does it say?
  • Teach them the five-fingered-approach-to-handing-someone-the-gospel. (Go here to see my previous blog on this approach: http://wp.me/p4ybbl-7W.  Ask them to share ideas with the whole group about how this approach could be applied in your community by your worship team.
  • Have a time of prayer led by those previously recruited to pray on the team’s behalf.
  • Rehearse one or more upcoming songs for future worship services.
  • Present videos of missional concepts. Some sources for missional videos that can be bought and downloaded are: http://www.ignitermedia.com; http://www.worshiphousemedia.com; http://www.sermonspice.com. (Note: You may use videos from YouTube or Vimeo or other web-sharing sites only if you are live-streaming the video from the Internet, according to current U.S. copyright laws.) Ask for quick first-impression responses to these videos from your worship team.
  • The retreat should continue in this pattern, alternating rehearsal of upcoming worship songs, with teaching of basic missional concepts from this blog or my book “Going Full Circle” (https://wipfandstock.com/going-full-circle.html) and other resources, followed by guided discussion.
  • Be sure to invite your lead pastor to come in and say a closing word of support and encouragement to the team for their vision. Close the retreat with a celebrative ending and commitment to continue to the next step. Announce step two, Missional Moments in Weekly Rehearsals, to begin in the next rehearsal.  I will present this plan next week right here.

Celebrate this first step into full-circle living in your worship ministry!  Bravo for your leadership to take your team to the next level and grow “worshiping disciples on mission”.  — Mark Powers


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“Rabbi” or “Lord”… What is Jesus to you?

Businessman Balancing SomethingWhile they were eating, He said, “I assure you: One of you will betray Me.”

Deeply distressed, each one began to say to Him, “Surely not I, Lord.” . . .

Then Judas, His betrayer, replied, “Surely not I, Rabbi?” “You have said it,” He told him.

Matthew 26:20-22,25-26, HCSB

Disciple or betrayer, the difference is found in one small word. The disciples called Jesus “Lord,” but Judas called him “Rabbi,” which means “teacher.” Many in the world know information about Jesus. But knowledge alone does not make a disciple. When Jesus is our Lord, he is our master, our spiritual boss, our authority. “To Judas, Jesus was a rabbi he respected, spent time with, and learned from, but Jesus was not lord of his life. Judas never surrendered his will to Jesus. He was informed but never transformed.”1 A disciple’s life is the expression of deep love for our Lord and Savior who transforms us daily through his power.

In previous blog posts, we studied the transformation process Jesus outlined in the Beatitudes. There we discovered how God transforms believers into disciples. How can we partner with God to develop a plan which will lead worship teams through transformation? How can we provide experiences to grow worship teams into missionaries?

Across the next three weeks, I will present a three-step plan to transform your worship team into a missional worship team.

Step One: The Missional Life Retreat.

Step Two: Missional Moments in Rehearsals.

Step Three: Full Circle Groups

Don’t miss it!  I’ll see you here next week.  — Mark Powers

1. Geiger, Kelley, Nation, Transformational Discipleship, 19.


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Leading Through Change: Step Four – Enlist your Leadership Team

Signs of Change  I also said to him, “If it pleases the king, may I have letters to the governors . . . that they will provide me safe-conduct. . . ?

And may I have a letter to Asaph, so he will give me timber. . . ?”

Nehemiah 2:7–8a, NIV

When God gave me the vision to start M3, the MusicArts Mission Movement among our South Carolina Baptist churches, I prepared to send out invitations to key worship leaders. My goal was to recruit six young worship leaders to join me in igniting the movement. But during the month I planned to send invitations, my father became ill and entered the hospital. Three weeks later God took my dad to heaven. Heartbroken, I was ready to delay the whole M3 process. My supervisor convinced me to send out a general e-mail anyway just to see what interest there might be. Within one week, I had six colleagues signed up and ready to jump aboard. God had already spoken to their hearts and enlisted them by the power of his Spirit. I simply needed to believe and obey God’s leadership.

The vision given to Nehemiah to rebuild the wall of Jerusalem must have seemed impossible. But God’s visions are uniquely designed for the one to whom they are given. God will not give you a vision without giving you the innate abilities to complete the task. God will also place around you the resources needed to fulfill the vision. Be open, nevertheless, to sharpening your leadership skills if God leads you to do so.

Make a list of candidates to serve on your mission leadership team and then approach them to share your vision.

  1. Help them see and understand the problems: the world is dying without Christ; churches are in decline; few Christians are being discipled and sent on mission for Christ. Then share your vision with them.
  2. Most importantly, express what you expect they will receive personally from their involvement. Share success stories and testimonies if you have them. All of us have a longing to be part of something with eternal significance. Appeal to that longing in them.
  3. Make sure that they understand that you are recruiting them for a limited time to accomplish a specific task. Few will sign on for unlimited service with no ending point in sight. Then step back and see how God moves in their hearts.

Remember that you cannot program people to respond positively to your vision or mission. Trust God to “call out the called” as he works in those he has chosen to join the mission. Do not take a “no” answer personally. Communicate your vision clearly and enthusiastically and then wait to see who God brings alongside you.

— Mark Powers

READERS: In September, I will be launching a new online e-classroom featuring 4-week basic training courses for worship leaders!  Stay tuned for more information about WORSHIPWISE.com.  Keep looking here for info and class registration.


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Leading Through Change: Step Three – Enlist Pastor Support

Resources Recommendations Then the king, with the queen sitting beside him, asked me,

“How long will your journey take, and when will you get back?”

It pleased the king to send me; so I set a time.

Nehemiah 2:6

Nehemiah sought support from his king to pursue the vision of rebuilding Jerusalem. A worship minister must receive the support of his senior pastor to pursue the missional vision. First, find ways to mention your vision in casual conversation, written memos, staff meetings, and face-to-face appointments. Charles Billingsley, worship leader with Jerry Falwell and David Jeremiah, refers to what he calls “the law of the seventh mentioning.” He believes we can plan on having to mention an idea at least seven times before it will appear on the radar of our pastor.

Attitude is crucial in the process of asking for endorsement and support from your pastor. This requires much prayer. Don’t rush into this meeting. Don’t let your excitement make you hurry. Set aside a week or two to pray. Ask God to shape your vision to match the vision of your pastor and vice versa. Your vision must be fused into your pastor’s vision for the church. Like a gardener who grafts a branch onto the main vine, you want your vision to enhance the pastor’s greater vision for the church.

When you have a sense of peace and confidence in the Lord, schedule a meeting with your pastor. Trust God to do his work between you. Begin by asking your pastor to share his overarching vision with you. We trust that the heart of every Christian executive is to fulfill Christ’s Great Commission. But he can express that in many different ways depending on his giftedness, personality, calling, and situation. He may say his vision is organizational unity, or financial security, or numerical growth. Continue to trust God’s Spirit no matter what your pastor expresses as a vision.

Your next question is crucial, asked in all sincerity: “How can I help you achieve this vision?” This discussion must be a sharing of hearts and not a sales presentation. Once you have heard their heart on this matter, then share the vision God has placed in your heart. If you are open and adaptable, God will shape your vision through the discussion with your pastor. You may leave the meeting with a different perspective on your vision and how to bring it to reality. But if you have soaked the meeting in prayer, you can trust that God had a hand in forging your vision through this meeting.

If the initial answer is “No,” don’t despair or give up. Ask permission to re-design and re-define your vision, then ask permission to come back and talk some more. If your pastor accepts your vision and pledges his support, schedule a follow-up appointment to present your written vision statement, smart goals, and action plans.

A prominent worship leader* who has successfully served his church for more than 20 years told me, “In pastoral relationships, there are no win-lose situations.” I asked him what he meant. “Any staff member is wrong to ever think he or she will win by making the pastor lose. If your pastor loses, you will lose. If you make sure the pastor wins, you will win, too,” he explained.

Here are three actions to make sure your pastor wins as you pursue your vision:

  1. Pastors need to trust you. They want to know who, what, when, where and why before trusting you. Using smart goals and action plans will help you earn trust.
  2. Pastors value unity. Your ability to keep people unified while successfully fulfilling the mission is a valuable trait. Your pastor and your church will value you for it.
  3. Pastors don’t like surprises. Make every attempt to keep your pastor informed by copying important documents and correspondence to him. Schedule regular updates in person. Share and celebrate victories and always communicate immediately if problems arise.

Worship Leaders – Is change bearing down on you? Don’t let it make you run and hide!  Lead your worship ministry through it and you will be leading your church… and maybe even your Pastor as well.  — Mark Powers

* Steve Phillips, Worship Pastor, First Baptist Columbia SC