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Growing Worshiping Disciples on Mission for Christ


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An Easy Discipleship Plan for Worship Leaders

IT’S YOUR TIME…

to become a Disciple-Maker who makes disciple-makers!

Here’s an easy plan that YOU can use to start an interactive, relational discipleship group to grow disciples in your worship ministry.  It’s simple, requires a minimum of preparation, but will lead to deeper discipling relationships in your group.  Remember… worship is not an end in itself, but rather the ignition key to discipleship and missions.  IT’S YOUR TIME!

  • Recruit and gather your group.  Start on time. At each group meeting, a different group member will volunteer to be the story-teller. A volunteer for the following week will be enlisted at the end of the session.
  • The leader will begin by asking those present to share some experiences they had during the past week. Ask: “How has God worked through you as his missionary since our last meeting?” After a few minutes of sharing, the leader will call on this week’s storyteller to begin today’s story.
  • The storyteller for this session will begin by saying: “This is the story from God’s word.” They then re-tell today’s Bible story from memory in their own words in an engaging manner that reflects their own personality. They should not add personal comments or explanation and should conclude by saying: “That’s the story from God’s word.”
  • The storyteller will ask someone to lead a prayer asking God to reveal his will for each participant in today’s group.
  • The storyteller directs the group to look at today’s Bible story in the Scripture. The storyteller will ask “what” and “why” questions of the group about the story. In this way, they will rebuild the story, checking to see if any element was omitted or accidentally changed
  • Discuss: “Which character in the story do you relate to most? Why?
  • Discuss: “What did you learn from this story that is new to you? What surprised you?”
  • Discuss: “What do we learn about God from this story?”
  • Discuss: “What do we learn about people from this story?”
  • Discuss: “How do you think God wants you to apply what you have learned?”
  • Accountability Question: “With whom will you share the story this week?”
  • Accountability question: “Where will you be on mission with God before our next meeting?”
  • Invite the group to pray aloud for each other to close the group study.
  • Enlist a storyteller for the next session.
  • Remind the group of total confidentiality of everything shared today. This is crucial and must be honored at all times.
  • State the next meeting date/time and then dismiss. Send the group out. End on time.

Here is a list of Bible stories and Scripture references for a curriculum to lead your group to go full circle in worship-discipleship-missions. These Bible stories focus first on worship, then discipleship, and finally missions for worship leaders. The stories are listed in chronological order as they occur in Scripture. But you may use them in the order that best fits your full circle group. There are eighteen stories listed, six each under the headings of worship-discipleship-mission.
Worship
Numbers 8:5–26: Calling and commissioning the Levites, worship
leaders in the Tabernacle.
1 Chronicles 29:1–20: David called the nation of Israel to build the temple.
Isaiah 6:1-8: God revealed himself to Isaiah in the temple.
Matthew 28:16–20: Jesus’ followers worshiped him and he gave them
the Great Commission.
Acts 16:16–40: Paul and Silas worshiped in prison; earthquake freed
them for mission.
Revelation 4:1–11: Worship in heaven around God’s throne.

Discipleship
Daniel 3: The golden image and the fiery furnace.
Daniel 6: Daniel in the lion’s den.
Matthew 4:18–22: Jesus calling the first disciples.
Luke 4:1–13: Satan tempted Jesus.
Mark 10:17–31: The rich young man.
John 13:1-30: The greatest commandment.

Mission
Jonah 1:1 to 3:5: God called Jonah to missions.
Matthew 9: 9–23: Jesus ate with sinners, taught about wineskins, and
healed many.
Matthew 18:1–6: Who is the greatest?
Luke 10:25–37: The parable of the good Samaritan.
Acts 15: 1–12: The Jerusalem Council.
Acts 17:16–34: Paul preached in Athens.

If you need help or other resources email me at markpowers@scbaptist.org.  I’m serving HIM by serving YOU!  MP

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How to Grow 14 Billion Disciplemakers in 70 years

http://egoodography.wix.com/home

Jesus went out and saw a tax collector named Levi sitting at the tax office,

and He said to him, “Follow Me!” So, leaving everything behind,

he got up and began to follow Him.

Luke 5:27–28, HCSB

Have you ever heard of the Bible-Storying Method of Discipleship? It’s an ancient-future approach to teaching the Bible and growing disciple-makers and it is sweeping the world in many different forms.  The goal is to grow spiritual dynamos who are fully invested in going full circle with God.  One of the forms this movement is taking is the Real Life Ministries approach.

Real Life Ministries (RLM) is a non-denominational Evangelical Christian church in Post Falls, Idaho. Planted in 1998, the church has grown to an average weekend attendance of more than 7,000. The unique characteristic of Real Life is a Bible study methodology called storying that grew out of a partnership with Avery Willis. Willis who served as president of an Indonesian seminary, wrote MasterLife discipleship plan, served as executive strategist for 5,500 missionaries with the International Mission Board, and ended his career with the International Orality Network.

After several years of discussion with Willis, Real Life decided to introduce Bible-storying into their small groups. The experiment was so successful that they trained all their pastors, community pastors, and small group leaders in the method. They found that the storying method:

  1. Helps people learn the Bible,
  2. Makes it easier to recruit small group leaders,
  3. Facilitates real learning,
  4. Equips members for ministry,
  5. Empowers parents to disciple their kids,
  6. Helps small group leaders understand the spiritual needs of those they are discipling,
  7. Keeps small groups from becoming boring, and
  8. Encourages transparency and real relationships.

Real Life identifies three major keys to making disciples according to God’s plan:

1. An intentional leader,

2. A relational environment,

3. A reproducible process.

The Real Life Discipleship Training Manual presents the mathematical process of kingdom multiplication:

  1. One disciple makes three disciple-makers every five years.
  2. If those three disciple-makers do the same every five years, in ten years there will be almost 180,000 disciple-makers.

  3. If they continue… in seventy years (less than the average life span), there are potentially fourteen billion disciple-makers. That is twice the number of people currently occupying our planet.

SO WHAT ARE WE WAITING FOR?  LET’S DO THIS!  Email me at markpowers@scbaptist.org and I’ll send you a Bible Storying method called “Discipleship TRIOS” that can help you make this happen. And next week in our next blog, I’ll share more details of what Bible-Storying is and how it can work for you. See you then.  — Mark Powers

 

*Putnam, Willis, Guindon, Krause. Real-Life Discipleship Training Manual: Equipping Disciples Who Make Disciples.


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Leading Through Change: Step Six – Respond to Opposition and Conflict

Signs of ChangeBut when Sanballat the Horonite, Tobiah the Ammonite official, and Geshem the Arab heard about it, they mocked and ridiculed us. “What is this you are doing?” they asked. “Are you rebelling against the king?” I answered them by saying, “The God of heaven will give us success. We his servants will start rebuilding, but as for you, you have no share in Jerusalem or any claim or historic right to it.”

Nehemiah 2:19–20, NIV

Every vision will encounter opposition. God’s chosen nation spent time in the wilderness between slavery and the Promised Land, and you will, too. The DISC personality inventory mentioned earlier tells us that 40 percent of us are “S” personalities. “S” personalities value steadiness, staying the course, and maintaining the status quo. Charles Arn, in his book, How to Start a New Service, identifies five levels of receptivity to change:

  • Innovators—Dreamers/Visionaries who embrace the future and are eager to embrace change but may not be accepted as leaders.
  • Early Adopters—Those who embrace a good idea on its own merit and are influential in moving it forward.
  • Middle Adopters—The majority. They tend to want to maintain the status quo and are influenced most by those opposing change rather than those supporting it.
  • Late Adopters—The last to endorse a new idea. Often they will not support any change regardless of merit until after it is adopted by the majority.
  • Never Adopters—Tend to be anti-change and will sow discord before, during, and after change is adopted.

 

Nehemiah experienced confrontation with detractors also. Nehemiah’s enemies circulated a rumor that his ambition was to become king. They planted the rumor to discredit him and undermine the mission. His three critics lived in his homeland but were not kindred. Expect there to be some who are not kindred spirits to your mission. Resistance will come; plan for it. I call this “anticipating some failure to reach more success.”

Casey Stengel, New York Yankee baseball manager in the 1950s, once said the key to leadership is to keep the five people who hate you away from the four who are undecided. In most organizations facing change, the middle adopters tend to listen to late adopters and never adopters. Your task as a leader is to empower the early adopters to inspire and lead the middle adopters to new ground.

An unknown source, tongue-in-cheek, has delineated five stages of innovation:

  1. Step One—People deny the innovation is required;
  2. Step Two—People deny the innovation will justify the effort;
  3. Step Three—People deny the innovation is important;
  4. Step Four—People deny the innovation is effective;
  5. Step Five—People accept the innovation, enjoy its benefits, attribute it to someone other than the innovator, and deny the existence of steps one through four.

When experiencing persecution, follow the example of Jesus. Jesus laid down his life for us. Don’t allow yourself to be a doormat to your critics, but do lay yourself down as a bridge to grace. We are most like Jesus when we share grace with someone who doesn’t deserve it. A servant leader imitating Jesus will absorb pain in his body to the point of brokenness. But our Lord has been there for us. On the other hand, Jesus also reserved some of his most confrontational words for religious critics. The ability to balance both godly grace and careful confrontation grows from brokenness before God. Remain a servant-leader, just as Jesus served us and died for us.

— Mark Powers

Readers: Please check out my WorshipWise ministry at http://www.WorshipWise.com.  Four-week classes online available 24/7 for only $99 each will launch in mid-September.  Excellent training at a GREAT price!

10 Arn, How to Start a New Service, 66–67.


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Leading Through Change: Step Four – Enlist your Leadership Team

Signs of Change  I also said to him, “If it pleases the king, may I have letters to the governors . . . that they will provide me safe-conduct. . . ?

And may I have a letter to Asaph, so he will give me timber. . . ?”

Nehemiah 2:7–8a, NIV

When God gave me the vision to start M3, the MusicArts Mission Movement among our South Carolina Baptist churches, I prepared to send out invitations to key worship leaders. My goal was to recruit six young worship leaders to join me in igniting the movement. But during the month I planned to send invitations, my father became ill and entered the hospital. Three weeks later God took my dad to heaven. Heartbroken, I was ready to delay the whole M3 process. My supervisor convinced me to send out a general e-mail anyway just to see what interest there might be. Within one week, I had six colleagues signed up and ready to jump aboard. God had already spoken to their hearts and enlisted them by the power of his Spirit. I simply needed to believe and obey God’s leadership.

The vision given to Nehemiah to rebuild the wall of Jerusalem must have seemed impossible. But God’s visions are uniquely designed for the one to whom they are given. God will not give you a vision without giving you the innate abilities to complete the task. God will also place around you the resources needed to fulfill the vision. Be open, nevertheless, to sharpening your leadership skills if God leads you to do so.

Make a list of candidates to serve on your mission leadership team and then approach them to share your vision.

  1. Help them see and understand the problems: the world is dying without Christ; churches are in decline; few Christians are being discipled and sent on mission for Christ. Then share your vision with them.
  2. Most importantly, express what you expect they will receive personally from their involvement. Share success stories and testimonies if you have them. All of us have a longing to be part of something with eternal significance. Appeal to that longing in them.
  3. Make sure that they understand that you are recruiting them for a limited time to accomplish a specific task. Few will sign on for unlimited service with no ending point in sight. Then step back and see how God moves in their hearts.

Remember that you cannot program people to respond positively to your vision or mission. Trust God to “call out the called” as he works in those he has chosen to join the mission. Do not take a “no” answer personally. Communicate your vision clearly and enthusiastically and then wait to see who God brings alongside you.

— Mark Powers

READERS: In September, I will be launching a new online e-classroom featuring 4-week basic training courses for worship leaders!  Stay tuned for more information about WORSHIPWISE.com.  Keep looking here for info and class registration.


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Leading Through Change: Step Three – Enlist Pastor Support

Resources Recommendations Then the king, with the queen sitting beside him, asked me,

“How long will your journey take, and when will you get back?”

It pleased the king to send me; so I set a time.

Nehemiah 2:6

Nehemiah sought support from his king to pursue the vision of rebuilding Jerusalem. A worship minister must receive the support of his senior pastor to pursue the missional vision. First, find ways to mention your vision in casual conversation, written memos, staff meetings, and face-to-face appointments. Charles Billingsley, worship leader with Jerry Falwell and David Jeremiah, refers to what he calls “the law of the seventh mentioning.” He believes we can plan on having to mention an idea at least seven times before it will appear on the radar of our pastor.

Attitude is crucial in the process of asking for endorsement and support from your pastor. This requires much prayer. Don’t rush into this meeting. Don’t let your excitement make you hurry. Set aside a week or two to pray. Ask God to shape your vision to match the vision of your pastor and vice versa. Your vision must be fused into your pastor’s vision for the church. Like a gardener who grafts a branch onto the main vine, you want your vision to enhance the pastor’s greater vision for the church.

When you have a sense of peace and confidence in the Lord, schedule a meeting with your pastor. Trust God to do his work between you. Begin by asking your pastor to share his overarching vision with you. We trust that the heart of every Christian executive is to fulfill Christ’s Great Commission. But he can express that in many different ways depending on his giftedness, personality, calling, and situation. He may say his vision is organizational unity, or financial security, or numerical growth. Continue to trust God’s Spirit no matter what your pastor expresses as a vision.

Your next question is crucial, asked in all sincerity: “How can I help you achieve this vision?” This discussion must be a sharing of hearts and not a sales presentation. Once you have heard their heart on this matter, then share the vision God has placed in your heart. If you are open and adaptable, God will shape your vision through the discussion with your pastor. You may leave the meeting with a different perspective on your vision and how to bring it to reality. But if you have soaked the meeting in prayer, you can trust that God had a hand in forging your vision through this meeting.

If the initial answer is “No,” don’t despair or give up. Ask permission to re-design and re-define your vision, then ask permission to come back and talk some more. If your pastor accepts your vision and pledges his support, schedule a follow-up appointment to present your written vision statement, smart goals, and action plans.

A prominent worship leader* who has successfully served his church for more than 20 years told me, “In pastoral relationships, there are no win-lose situations.” I asked him what he meant. “Any staff member is wrong to ever think he or she will win by making the pastor lose. If your pastor loses, you will lose. If you make sure the pastor wins, you will win, too,” he explained.

Here are three actions to make sure your pastor wins as you pursue your vision:

  1. Pastors need to trust you. They want to know who, what, when, where and why before trusting you. Using smart goals and action plans will help you earn trust.
  2. Pastors value unity. Your ability to keep people unified while successfully fulfilling the mission is a valuable trait. Your pastor and your church will value you for it.
  3. Pastors don’t like surprises. Make every attempt to keep your pastor informed by copying important documents and correspondence to him. Schedule regular updates in person. Share and celebrate victories and always communicate immediately if problems arise.

Worship Leaders – Is change bearing down on you? Don’t let it make you run and hide!  Lead your worship ministry through it and you will be leading your church… and maybe even your Pastor as well.  — Mark Powers

* Steve Phillips, Worship Pastor, First Baptist Columbia SC


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Jesus’ Secret for Leading Through Change

Jesus5 Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion?

Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life.

I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me—watch how I do it.

Learn the unforced rhythms of grace.

I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me. You’ll learn to live freely and lightly.

Matthew 11:28–30, The Message

Dictionary.com defines change as: “1. to make the form, nature, content, future course, etc., of something different from what it is, or from what it would be if left alone; 2. to transform or convert.”

An unknown writer said: “I cannot say whether things will get better if we change; what I can say is that they must change if they are to get better.”

Socrates said: “Let him who would change the world first change himself.”

The Bible talks about change, too. Most Scriptures using the word “change” are assurances that God’s nature will remain unchanged throughout eternity. The remaining Scriptures mentioning change are commands to change our lives to align with God. Though God’s nature never changes, the world he created is ever-changing. Change is a naturally occurring result of a dynamic universe made by a creative God. So we must learn to lead through change because change is always going to be a part of life.

The Scripture above is the secret to unlock Jesus’ plan for leading through change: God is the real leader, and we are following him.

Henry and Richard Blackaby, in their book, Spiritual Leadership: Moving People on to God’s Agenda, wrote: “The key to spiritual leadership is for leaders to understand God’s will for them and their organizations. They then move people away from their own agendas and on to God’s.”

The Scripture in Matthew 11 tells us to “walk, work, and watch” in God, so we will “learn the unforced rhythms of grace.” A leader must stay so close to God that we hear his whisper and walk in his shadow. There is no guarantee that this level of trust and obedience will bring success in worldly terms. Jesus lived like this, and it took him to the cross. Yet we trust in the power of the resurrection regardless of the sacrifice it takes to get there.

GO walk every step with God, and be the leader HE has called you and gifted you to be!  — Mark Powers